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Moral panic and produce

by Luigi Guarino on August 24, 2016

It’s hard to be a hipster these days. No sooner are you told that your quinoa habit is ruining the livelihoods of Bolivian farmers, that news comes along that your guacamole is contributing to deforestation in Mexico. Fortunately, data, and sober analysis, are on hand to provide a measure of reassurance to our beauteously bearded brethren.

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IP for smallholder farmers

by Luigi Guarino on August 17, 2016

Thanks a lot to Susan Bragdon for summarizing her latest paper for us.

The Quaker United Nations Office has released a paper by Chelsea Smith and myself looking at the relationship between intellectual property (IP) and small scale farmer innovation. The paper will also be available in Chinese, French and Spanish shortly.

IP systems are an attempt to incentivize innovation in agriculture and ensure its availability to the public. The familiar mantra holds that breeders and scientists need incentives to create. However, the majority of innovation in agriculture happens in absence of IP rights — on the farm, by small-scale farmers. And what they’re doing is important.

While small-scale farmers themselves are typically not driven to conserve, develop, adapt, invent and otherwise display their immense ingenuity for the ends of attaining exclusionary rights to commercialize their “products”, some kinds of IP tools have the potential to actively support their efforts. Or at the very least leave farmers to do what they do in peace. The paper discusses how alternative or sui generis plant variety protection systems (as opposed to UPOV-style PVP systems), collective and certification trademarks, and geographical indications may support on-farm innovation — when carefully selected and adapted to suit the realities of domestic agricultural sectors.

On the other hand, IP tools that are more conventionally believed to incentivize innovation in agriculture (i.e. patents, UPOV-style PVP systems, and less commonly trade secrets) may actually impede farmers’ innovation.

The paper is part of QUNO’s work to build mutual understanding of the importance of small scale farmers and agrobiodiversity across treaty bodies of relevance. There is quite a complex international legal architecture relating to small-scale farmers, innovation and IP, including the CBD, Nagoya Protocol, ITPGRFA, WTO TRIPS Agreement, UPOV and the WIPO IGC. Unfortunately, we have very little, if any real collaboration going on among the secretariats of these treaties to try to establish some coherence: coordination tends to be limited to formal reports sent from one governing body to another. We’re going to need to do a lot better in order to meet SDG 2 relating to food security.

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Peruvian genebank to get bigger, but how much?

17 August 2016

There’s much excitement over on my Facebook page about the announcement of a cash infusion for the Peruvian genebank. I’ll be here, holding my breath.

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Eat this newsletter

16 August 2016

Jeremy’s latest Eat This Podcast newsletter is out, chock full of tasty tidbits. As for the podcast itself, the most recent is about Elkstone Farm in Colorado, and asks the question: How do you grow food when the growing season is less than three months long? Spoiler alert: bears are an issue too.

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How to sample for diversity

15 August 2016

Attentive readers may remember a two-part post from about a year ago from Dr Sean Hoban, on how to maximize genetic diversity in seed collections. Well, Sean has a piece in the latest Samara magazine from Kew on much the same topic, but with better illustrations. Plus you get a bunch of other articles as […]

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Finger on the pulse in Rio

15 August 2016

My latest from the work blog: There seems to be a bit of an issue over at the Olympics with fast food marketing, but if athletes in Rio, or indeed spectators, want a simple, cheap meal that’s also healthy, and hopefully sourced more sustainably, they could do a lot worse than tucking into the Brazilian […]

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Brainfood: Ryegrass genome, Pest distributions, German oregano, Pápalos distribution, Chinese pea, Dutch cattle, Animal biobanking, Legumes everywhere, Crop diversification in China, Asian fermentation

15 August 2016

An ultra-high density genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) based on a reference shotgun genome assembly. Zzzzzzz. Future Risks of Pest Species under Changing Climatic Conditions. We’re doomed. Antioxidant capacity variation in the oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) collection of the German National Genebank. It’s huge. Fantastic. The best […]

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Sailing to Byzantium

12 August 2016

Futurefarmers has been collecting, growing and distributing a selection of “ancient grains” in Oslo since 2013. The selection of seeds to be taken on Seed Journey have been “rescued” from various locations in the Northern Hemisphere — from the very formal (seeds saved during the Siege of Leningrad from the Vavilov Institute Seed Bank) to […]

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